The Last Word by Kathy Herman

I just finished a Christian suspense novel that you  might enjoy.  By way of introduction, I’d like to let you hear an interview with the author:

Why do you consider your novels to be Bible studies without the homework?
 
I guess because my characters ask the hard questions that we all ask—and struggle until they find answers. Even though my books are exciting and entertaining, I weave the morality struggles through the storyline right along with the suspense elements to keep the reader turning the pages. I like to think of my books as “no guilt” reading. It’s fiction, but with a biblical, inspirational message that is relevant to everyday life.
 
For those who didn’t catch the first installment in the series, can you give us a little background about Sophie Trace and its main characters?
 
Sophie Trace is a fictional town in the shadow of the Great Smoky Mountains (not far from Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge). It’s pretty town of 13,000 and tourism is big. Many people who grew up here believe that a history of unexplained crimes is the work of the red shadows—the spirits of the departed Cherokee who roam the countryside seeking to do wreak havoc on the descendants of those who took their land.
 
In the first book, The Real Enemy, the main character, Brill Jessup, is the first female police chief in Sophie Trace. She took the position after a stellar eighteen-year career on the Memphis police force—mostly to escape some painful memories.
 
Brill and her husband, Kurt, are struggling through marital problems and are staying together to raise their youngest child, nine-year-old Emily. Their two oldest children, Ryan and Vanessa away at college.
 
While Brill is trying to cope with her unrelenting bitterness and un-forgiveness, she is faced with a series of bizarre disappearances in Sophie Trace—the biggest crime in the town’s history. She has to come to grips with the superstition around the red shadows legend and how it affects the community’s thinking—and figure out the truth of what’s going on.
 
Meanwhile, Kurt commits to winning her back by taking seriously the words of Romans 12:21, “Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.” He strives to overcome the very evil he has created and put his family back together.
 
Tell us about the Scripture verse upon which The Last Word is based.  Why is this theme so important to you?
 
The Last Word, the second book in the series, is based on Romans 1:16, “For I am not ashamed of the gospel, because it is the power of God for the salvation of everyone who believes…” 
 
I chose Romans 1:16 and built a story around it because there’s never been a time in history when believers have had a greater chance to make an impact on  lost and dying world. With the Internet all the social networking venues, each of us has a chance to share our faith in ways never before possible. But so often, we don’t speak up. In fact, we don’t look or sound any different than the world. It’s as though we’ve lost our zeal for the Great Commission or simply don’t feel comfortable acting on it. My hope is that this riveting story will inspire believers to be ambassadors of the faith as we’ve been empowered to be.
 
Full of suspense, The Last Word follows Police Chief Brill Jessup as she tries to catch a killer on the loose.  Can you describe Brill for us?
 
To quote her detective captain, “She’s a redheaded spitfire.” Brill’s intuition has served her well, and she can crack open a case faster than almost anyone. She’s an honest cop who brings a lot of experience to this town that is starting to experience big city crime. She’s principled. Fair. Tough. And prayerful. Her faith has been tested many times, not just on the job, but in her marriage. For Brill, law enforcement is much more than a job—it’s a calling. Though she doesn’t wear it on her sleeve, Brill strives hard to honor God in the way she treats her officers and the way she protects the community.
 
What dilemmas does Brill’s daughter, Vanessa, encounter during the book?
 
Vanessa has to decide whether or not to keep the baby she’s carrying or give him up for adoption. She’s single and still in college. The baby’s father is her psychology professor. And after she told him she was pregnant and then refused his ultimatum that she get an abortion, he disappeared without a trace. Vanessa is heartbroken but is crazy about the baby. She has no way to support him.
 
As if that weren’t enough, Vanessa is also friends with an old man who is dying—and she’s forced out of her comfort zone by some of his taunting spiritual questions and must decide whether she’s willing to stand up for her faith and tell him he needs Jesus. Especially when she knows she’s not a shining example of what a Christian should be.
 
Ultimately, Vanessa must confront the affair she had with her professor and admit to herself that it was sinful—and allow God to take away the guilt she doesn’t realize has crippled her relationship with God.

I really like way that this author deals with issues.  She has her characters confront real life issues, and she doesn’t give contrived or easy resolutions.  She does seem to feel the need to present the gospel more than once during the story, but she was far less contrived than the last Christian fiction author that I read. 

The suspense, plot and real conflict in this story are very good. 

You will find this book on Amazon.com.

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2 Responses to “The Last Word by Kathy Herman”

  1. Jeanine Says:

    Hmmm… These books sound interesting and relevant! I hope you’re getting paid to write these reviews, as you do a great job!

  2. The Right Call by Kathy Herman « Says:

    […] In January, I reviewed the second book in this series, The Last Word. […]

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